Mount Rundemanen

I’m slowly conquering Bergen’s seven mountains. My latest addition is Rundemanen.

Rundemanen – The-Much-Easier-Second-Tallest-Mountain

At 568 metres (1,864 ft) in height, it is the second highest of Bergen’s seven mountains. However, it is a much, much easier hike than Ulriken. Most of the way is paved and the whole trip takes about three to four hours, depending on how many photos you take.

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And how long you enjoy the view at the top ❤

Rundemanen is easily accessible. There are several routes to the top, but the most common is to first conquer Fløyen (the easiest mountain) and move from there to Rundemanen. The start to Fløyen is located in the city center.

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The path is beautiful, and it only takes about 30-45 minutes to reach the top.


At the top of Fløyen you might want to have your first break and enjoy parts of your lunch. Yes, bring lunch. There is a café, but everything is overpriced. Shop some cookies and fruit in a grocery store before you start hiking. Chances are you will find the grocery store pretty expensive too, but one cannot hike on an empty stomach. If you’re in Norway, you’re in Norway!

IMG_20171021_130645.jpgFløyen is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Bergen, one can see why.

If you feel like stopping at Fløyen, remember why you started.

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Rundemanen is worth it!

 

Dublin Castle

There since the days of King John, the Dublin Castle still stands. Large, yet not colossal. Hidden, yet not forgotten. Amongst new buldings, the castle can be found in the centre of Dublin. The outside is befitting the royals that once lived there. However, it still doesn’t do the inside justice.

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From the side of the castle

Tourists can only visit parts of the castle. You can either buy a self-guided ticket (and download a free app for an audio guide) and venture through the State Apartments, or you can join a tour that also shows the Viking Excavation and the Chapel Royal. Student tickets are available.

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The State Drawing room. Today in use for the reception of foreign dignitaries.

The royals were all about fireplaces, floor to ceiling windows and chandeliers. They had at least two fireplaces in every room, and a room for every possible occasion. I wonder what it was like living here. Were they happy? Did they sometimes wish to be normal, and not have to follow each uncomfortable (#corsets) fashion trend?

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Because if you didn’t look like this guy, were you even a royal?

I would recommend a visit to the Dublin Castle to anyone in the area. Be prepared to spend at least an hour and a half. It’s easy to lose yourself in imagining how they lived, and fascinating to compare the previous functions of the rooms to the new ones. The castle is a significant part of the history of Dublin, and will continue to be.

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Saint Patrick’s Hall. Formerly the ballroom, today used for presidential inaugurations.

Dublin, Ireland

Dublin is organized chaos. It is a mix of soft and hard, modern and old. In one moment you can walk down cobblestone streets with flowers hanging from every lamppost. In the next, the edges of the modern houses are in sharp contrast to the traditional brick ones. And then, suddenly, palm trees.

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The traditional Irish weather is overcast, with a strong chance of lots of rain. 

Dublin is the largest city and capital of Ireland. Walking around today, you’d never think it started as a Viking settlement. The citizens seem constantly happy, and the sound of clinking glasses and Irish music drift out through the open doors of the many local pubs – seven days a week. Inbetween there’s loud voices speaking polite words.

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You can find the Dublin Castle amongst colorful new buildings.

I love Dublin so far. It is welcoming and tourist-friendly. My only objection is that if you can’t party like the Irish – find a hotel outside of the city centre. Irish people believe that a couple of pints a day keeps the doctor away, and sleep is therefore overrated. Lastly, if someone asks you to join them for “strong tea”, you better believe it’s not tea.

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I’m in love with these lampposts ❤

Nesebar – The City of Roses

We went to Nesebar to see a different part of Bulgaria. The old town was everything we hoped it would be. Serene, homly, and full of ruins. The new part was pretty similar, only sans the ruins and with slightly newer buildings.

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Ruin of a church, Old town.

Old Nesebar, a tourist magnet, had the unique silence of a beautiful place that don’t need to be loud to be noticed. We walked around and took in the sights – visted a church, and stopped by one of the tiny shops that sold rose-related products. Roses were everywhere in Nessebar, both in the old and new part.

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I will forever remember it as the city of roses.

Walking here and there, no destination in mind, we enjoyed the view. We were also entertained by a local who tried to convince us to eat at his restaurant by speaking Norwegian. I wonder what it must be like to constantly have your city crowded with tourists. Good for business, but otherwise?

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This picture doesn’t do the ocean justice, it was azure and clear – effortlessly amazing.

The atmosphere in Nesebar makes it worth a visit, so if you’re ever in Bulgaria – do take a day trip, and enjoy lots and lots of (cheap) ice cream in one of the cute, local cafés!

 

Sunny Beach, Bulgaria

My first impression of Bulgaria is that it is an old country. Leaving Burgas Airport we passed farm after farm, sunflower field after sunflower field. The houses are small, made out of rock and have orange roofs. Cosy, calm and inviting.

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Green as far as the eye can see

However, from the the good kind of old, to the “needs refurbishing”-kind. In Sunny Beach, the sidewalk is cracked (suitcase vs sidewalk? Sidewalk), the bins are overflowing, and the four star hotel I’m staying at? Probably not going to recommend it to anyone.

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Now, this impression might be unfair. Sunny Beach is infamous for having people visit only to party, so I suspect this place is different without the tourists.

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A typical beach activity? 

BUT, negativity aside, the locals are helpful (albeit surprised that a tourist would rather find the local bus than take a taxi). They have all the time in the world (except when driving, watch out), and have a general friendliness about them that makes them easy to approach.

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I love big waves ❤

Finally – it’s warm. Oh sweet warmth, I haven’t had much of you in Norway. In addition, the beach is amazing, and I’m here with two good friends. First impressions can be deceptive; who knows what this trip will become? Five (probably awesome) days left!

The Cardiac Medical Ward

It’s me again. Still alive.

If you wonder where I’ve been; I’ve spent the last month in the cardiac medical ward. As an employee, thankfully. I got a summer job as an assistant. I’ve learned a great deal, and I’ve never been more sure of my choice of studying nursing.

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However, it’s only now I fully realize what I’ve gotten myself into. Picture walking into a room, and wonder if the person there is breathing. Picture having a pleasant conversation, and it suddenly turns into “can you hear me? Hey, are you still with me?” and an emergency team. At all times, two heartbeats may turn to one.

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The absence of a heartbeat is the loudest silence I’ve ever heard.

Now, don’t misunderstand me, most of the time everything turns out okay. One evening might be about her heartbeat slowing and mine racing, but the next morning it’ll be like it never happened, and we go back to me saying “bear with me, I’m sure I’ll figure out how to change ECG/EKG paper eventually…” and she replying “I remember being a student, oh those were the days…”

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This picture is from the basement. Want to guess how many times I got lost down here?

In Norway, it takes three years to become a nurse. In the fall I start my second year. It’s still a long road in front of me, but what an adventure. And at this moment, I see only green lights ahead.