Mount Rundemanen

I’m slowly conquering Bergen’s seven mountains. My latest addition is Rundemanen.

Rundemanen – The-Much-Easier-Second-Tallest-Mountain

At 568 metres (1,864 ft) in height, it is the second highest of Bergen’s seven mountains. However, it is a much, much easier hike than Ulriken. Most of the way is paved and the whole trip takes about three to four hours, depending on how many photos you take.

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And how long you enjoy the view at the top ❤

Rundemanen is easily accessible. There are several routes to the top, but the most common is to first conquer Fløyen (the easiest mountain) and move from there to Rundemanen. The start to Fløyen is located in the city center.

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The path is beautiful, and it only takes about 30-45 minutes to reach the top.


At the top of Fløyen you might want to have your first break and enjoy parts of your lunch. Yes, bring lunch. There is a café, but everything is overpriced. Shop some cookies and fruit in a grocery store before you start hiking. Chances are you will find the grocery store pretty expensive too, but one cannot hike on an empty stomach. If you’re in Norway, you’re in Norway!

IMG_20171021_130645.jpgFløyen is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Bergen, one can see why.

If you feel like stopping at Fløyen, remember why you started.

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Rundemanen is worth it!

 

Hiking Bergen!

Bergen is renowned for its mountains. They surround the city; are there in the distance no matter which way you turn. I recently climbed my third one, and hope to find myself at the top of at least two more this year. I wanted to share some pictures from the three I have been to: (Travel inspo people!)

Fløyen: The Family-friendly mountain

Fløyen is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Bergen. It takes roughly 30 minutes to the top, and the whole way is asphalted (so some sporty Norwegians even bring their youngest in strollers) On the way you can take a detour and find Norway’s largest tree.

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Ulriken
: The Are-we-even-getting-closer

Ulriken is Bergen’s tallest mountain. There are several tracks to the top with a varying degree of difficulty, but no matter which one you choose you’re going to be tired when you reach the top. Bring lots of water, lunch, and a I’m-not-giving-up attitude.

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Blåmanen
: The Companions-More-Sporty-Than-You-Not-Adviced

Blåmanen is up Fløyen and onwards. The path is good, and the hike is suitable for most people as long as you have time to walk in your on tempo. The view is magnificent, so if you do Fløyen, do this one too (3-4 hour trip – depending on how camera crazy you are!)

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Happy hiking!

The Mountains Sing of Bergen

Bergen is the city of Seven Mountains. You’ll see one no matter in which direction you turn. I have three years in this wonderful city, and have promised myself by the end of my studies – I will have mounted them all.

They say it’s all about the climb. Normally I would feel inclined to agree, but when my friends and I arrived at the top (out of breath) it was all about the sunset. All about the view. All about experiencing something so pure and beautiful together. No wonder Mount Ulriken has a central role in the song of Bergen.

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“Sang til Bergen” / “Song to Bergen” (first verse)

Holding my newly tuned sitar in my hands;
all my grief left me on the peak of Ulriken.
Thought of the beacons if they would be lighted,
and against foes order out the marching men.
Felt the calm upon me, rejoiced in my spirit,
and reached for my sitar with playful hands.

P.S. No, I did not mean to write “guitar”, sitar is actually an instrument!

A Poem to Bergen, Norway

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As thou sittest there
Skerry-bound and fair,
Mountains high around and ocean’s deep before thee,
On thee casts her spell
Saga, that shall tell
Once again the wonders of our land.

– Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson (Norwegian poet)

The Thing About the Norwegian King

“It is not always easy to determine where we are from. What we call home is where our heart is, and that cannot always be placed within country boarders.” – Harald V, King of Norway.

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Our King and Queen. Obviously not my own photo.

A couple of days ago the Norwegian King held a speech. The Norwegian media has been going on about it every day since. In short it’s about us accepting who “us” is becoming, and already has become. It’s about Norwegians being a people made up of, yes; people from all regions of Norway, but also people from Afghanistan, Poland, Sweden and so on. It’s about Norwegians being one.

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On 17th of May, Norway’s Constitution Day, all Norwegians celebrate.

From time to time I question why Norway is still a monarchy. I question the monarch’s importance and if we really need one. However, this is not one of those times. Our monarch is an important symbol, and when Norway needs to unite, whether it be in grief or in celebration, we turn to the Castle. When Norway was hit by a terrorist attack in 2011 we put flowers in front of, not the parliament, not the hospitals, but the castle. Always the Castle.

You can (hopefully) see the speech here: (I don’t think it’ll show up in the usual email)

 

The Importance of a Thrown Pen.

It was during a lecture it happened.

I was twirling my pen between my fingers, and somehow, it slipped. However, instead of falling to the floor with the usual soft sound, it flew into the backhead of the guy sitting in front of me. He promtly turned, to see who exactly threw a pen at him. Our conversation went like this:

“What?” he asked.
“Um, I just- It slipped.” I smiled tryingly.
“”It slipped.”… Into the back of my head?”
“Well, yeah! I was twirling it and then-”
“Sure, that’s what happened.” He turned back,

Leaving me with a half open mouth and an urge to actually throw my pen at him.

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My weapon of choice, apparently.